According to Reports, Apple won't appeal the Historic Maryland Store Unionization Decision

According to Reports, Apple won't appeal the Historic Maryland Store Unionization Decision

According to Reuters, the business intends to negotiate "in good faith

According to reports, Apple will not contest the recent decision by workers at its Maryland retail site at Towson Town Center to unionize. According to Reuters, the internet giant will engage in negotiations "in good faith," citing a "source familiar with the company's plans." Apple chose not to respond to the report. Employees at the Towson Town Center Apple Store overwhelmingly approved joining the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers in a vote that took place on June 19. 65 of the approximately 110 workers who were able to vote in the election did so. After organizers at a store in Georgia called off a poll due to allegations of intimidation, Towson Town Center became the first Apple retail location in the US to vote on unionization. If the information from Reuters is true and Apple does not intend to contest the Towson vote, its strategy would be at odds with much of corporate America. Amazon, for example, promptly spoke out against the historic vote at its JFK8 plant in Staten Island and announced it will appeal the outcome due to claims the Amazon Labor Union bullied employees and engaged in "electioneering." Companies sometimes contest union votes as a means of delaying the negotiating process and dousing subsequent organizing initiatives, even if their appeals are ultimately rejected. Google and Android both have tracking IDs that are employed in advertising. The senators claimed that even though the identifiers are meant to be anonymous, data brokers are selling databases that connect them to customer names, email addresses, and phone numbers. Apple updated iOS last year with tougher privacy controls for app monitoring, forcing apps to get users' consent before collecting their unique Identification for Advertisers device code. They said that Google continues to allow the tracking identity by default. However, the business has already made features to make it more difficult to track users between apps, and it has promised to improve Android's Privacy Sandbox "with the goal of delivering new, more private advertising alternatives." More Perfect Union and The Washington Post claimed that Apple is no different, stating that "Saturday evening's initial number was 65-33, and the official count was pending." Billy Jarboe, a Towson employee, told the newspaper that although the company's effort to undercut the union drive "certainly spooked individuals," most backers of the project remained unconvinced. An Apple official declined to comment. Going into a new phase of this type of work "simply feels nice," Jarboe said. "Hopefully it sparks a spark the other businesses can leverage this momentum." Another Towson employee, Eric Brown, told the Washington Post that organizers of a failed unionization effort at a store in Atlanta "let us know what some of the talking points and tactics were going to be, and we were able to let folks know some of the things they may do." In a similar vein, Tyra Reeder told The New York Times that the Atlanta shop had provided "some insight into things that were coming," referring to the company's assertions that a contract negotiation process might result in employees losing some benefits.
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