A Dissection of the Mac Studio exposes Potentially Upgradeable SSD Storage

A Dissection of the Mac Studio exposes Potentially Upgradeable SSD Storage

There are two SSD ports on the device

During Max Tech's deconstruction of the Mac Studio, the channel's presenter Max Yuryev discovers two SSD connectors, which is a unique feature of Apple's new hardware. This could imply that the Mac Studio's storage is, after all, upgradeable.

More good news: the SSD slots appear to be pretty straightforward to access - Yuryev removes the Studio's rubber backing to uncover four screws connecting the bottom half of the device's shell in the video. Yuryev notices two SSD ports hidden beneath the Mac Studio's power supply after removing that panel, which he claims may be accessed without pulling the computer apart any further.

Yuryev examines the SSD ports as he continues to disassemble the Studio, removing the power supply and aluminum backing. He says the ports are similar to those on his 2019 Mac Pro at first sight, but when he tries out the Mac Pro's SSD, it doesn't quite fit. Users can replace their existing SSD with one that supports up to 8TB of storage with Apple's SSD kit for the Mac Pro.

Users are unable to access the Mac Studio's storage, according to Apple. Apple (screenshot)

However, as Yuryev points out, Apple explicitly states on the Mac Studio's product page that customers will not be able to access the device's storage. According to Apple's remark, "Mac Studio storage is not user accessible."

"Consider configuring to a greater capacity if you anticipate you'll need additional storage capacity in the future."

The Mac Studio is available with up to 8TB of internal storage; the standard model with 512GB SSD storage costs $1,999, and adding 8TB costs $2,400 more. Although the Studio's internal storage may be upgradeable in the future, there is no way to upgrade the RAM after purchasing the computer because it is built into Apple's M1 chip.

It's unclear if a similar DIY SSD installation kit for the Mac Studio will be released in the future, as Apple's phrasing suggests that the process should be done by a professional. Apple presently allows users to add more RAM to their iMac Pros at Apple Stores or approved service providers, but that doesn't stop techies from doing it themselves using third-party components (like those offered by Mac part provider OWC).

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